DIVISION OF LABOUR & Guidelines on Coordination

After Departmentalization, the second main consideration of any organizing effort is how to divide labour.

Division of Labour is the assignment of various portions of a particular task among a no. of organization members. Rather than one individual doing the entire job, several individuals perform different parts of it.

Production is divided into a no. of steps, with the responsibility for completing various steps assigned to specific individuals.

The essence of division of labour is the individuals specialize in doing part of a task rather than the entire task.

 

Advantages & Disadvantages of Division of Labour:

Several explanations are available for the usefulness of division of labour.

  • When workers specialize in a particular task, their skill at performing that task tends to increase.                                                                                            
  • Workers who have 1 job and 1 place in which to do it, do not lose valuable time changing tools or locations.                                                                 
  • When workers concentrate on performing only one job, they naturally try to make their job easier and more efficient.                                                        
  • Division of labour creates a situation in which workers need only to know how to perform their part of the work task rather than the entire process for producing the end product.

Dis Advantages of Excessive Division Of Labour:

Division of labour focuses solely on  efficiency and economic benefit and overlooks the human variable in organizations.

Work that is extremely specialized tends to be boring and therefore will eventually cause production rates to go down as workers become resentful of being treated like machines.

Managers need to find a reasonable balance between specialization and human motivation.

COORDINATION:

In a division of labour situation, the importance of effective coordination of the different individuals doing portions  of the task is obvious.

Coordination is the orderly arrangement of group effort to provide unity of action in the pursuit of a common purpose. Coordination is the means for achieving any and all organizational objectives.

Coordination involves encouraging the completion of individual portions of a task in a synchronized order that is appropriate for the overall task.

Groups need coordination for maintaining productivity.

Establishing and maintaining coordination may required close supervision of employees. Managers can establish and maintain coordination through bargaining, formulating a common purpose for the group, or improving on specific problem solutions so the group will know what to do when it encounters those problems.

 

Mary Parker Follett’s Guidelines on Coordination:

  1. Coordination can be attained with least difficulty through direct horizontal relationships and personal communications. When a coordination problem arises, peer discussion may be the best way to resolve it.                                                                                                                                     
  2. Coordination be a discussion topic throughout the planning process. Managers should plan for coordination.                                                                        
  3. Maintaining coordination is a continuing process and should be treated as such. Managers cannot assume that because their management system shows coordination today, it will show coordination tomorrow.                                                                                                       
  4. Human element is important and the communication process is an essential consideration in any attempt to encourage coordination.               
  5. Employee skill levels and motivation levels are also primary considerations for the coordination activity.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

STRUCTURE:

In any organizing effort, managers must choose an appropriate structure.

Structure refers to the designated relationships among resources of the management system. Its purpose is to facilitate the use of each resource, individually and collectively, as the management system attempts to attain its objectives.

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART:

An organizational chart is constructed in pyramid form, with individuals toward the top of the pyramid having more authority and responsibility than those toward the bottom.

The relative positioning of individuals within boxes on the chart indicates broad working relationships, and lines between boxes designate formal lines of communication between individuals.

AUTHORITY & RESPONSIBILITY:

The dotted line is not part of the organization chart but has been added to emphasize the chart’s pyramid shape. The locations of the positions also indicate broad working relationships.

FORMAL & INFORMAL STRUCTURE:

Formal structure is defined as the relationships among organizational resources as outlined by Management. It is represented primarily by the Organization Chart.

Informal Structure is defined as the patterns of relationships that develop because of informal activities of organization members. It evolves naturally and tend to be molded by individual norms and values and social relationships.

DEPARTMENTALIZATION & FORMAL STRUCTURE:

Department is a unique group of resources established by management to perform some organizational task. The process of establishing departments within the management system is called DEPARTMENTALIZATION.

FUNCTIONAL DEPARTMENTALIZATION:

The most widely used basis for establishing departments within the formal structure is the type of work functions (activities) being performed within the management system.

Functions are typically divided into major categories like  marketing, production and finance, etc.,

 

PRODUCT DEPARTMENTALIZATION:

Organization structure based primarily on product departmentalizes resources according to the products being manufactured. As the company grows and as their product range grows, it becomes increasing difficult for management to coordinate activities across the organization.

Organizing on the lines of products and product groups permits the logical grouping of resources across the organization.

GEOGRAPHICAL DEPARTMENTALIZATION:

Structure based primarily on territory departmentalizes according to the places where the work is being done or the geographic markets on which the management system is focusing.

The physical distances can range from quite short (between 2 points in the same city) to quite long ( between 2 points in the same state or different states or countries or continents).

As market areas expand and the work locations increase, the physical distances between places can make the management task extremely cumbersome. To minimize this problem, resources can be departmentalized according to the territory.

 

CUSTOMER DEPARTMENTALIZATION:

Structure based primarily on the customer establishes departments in response to the organization’s major customers.

This structure,of course, assumes that major customers can be identified and divided into logical categories.

 

MANUFACTURING PROCESS DEPARTMENTALIZATION:

Structure based primarily on manufacturing process departmentalizes according tot he major phases of the process used to manufacture products.

 

*** FORCES INFLUENCING FORMAL STRUCTURE***

According to Shetty & Carlisle, the formal structure of a management system is continually evolving.

4 Primary forces influences this evolution:

  1. Manager
  2. Task
  3. Environment
  4. Subordinates

The evolution of a particular organization is actually the result of a complex and dynamic interaction among these forces.

MANAGER:

Each manager perceives the organizational problem in a unique way. Naturally, knowledge, experience, background and values influence the manager’s perception of what the organization’s formal structure should be or how it should be changed.

TASK:

Task includes the degree of technology involved in performing the task and the task’s complexity. As task activities change, a force is created to change the existing organization.

ENVIRONMENT:

Environment include the customers and suppliers of the management system, along with existing political and social structures.

SUBORDINATES:

Sub ordinates include the needs and skill  levels of subordinates.

Changes in the environment or subordinate dynamics can effect a change in the organization.

ORGANIZING – 16 General guidelines by Henri Fayol

Organizing is the process of establishing orderly uses for all resources within the management system.

Here, Orderly signifies the emphasis on the attainment of management system objectives and assist managers not only in making objectives apparent but in clarifying which resources will be used to attain them.

IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIZING:

The organizing function is extremely important to the management system because it is the primary mechanism mangers use to activate plans.

Organizing creates and maintains relationships between all organizational resources by indicating which resources are to be used for specified activities and when,where, and how they are to be used.

A thorough  organizing efforts helps managers to minimize costly weaknesses, such as duplication of effort and idle organizational resources.

If there were to be an organizing department, it’s responsibilities will include:

  • Reorganization plans that make the management system more effective and efficient.
  • Plans to improve managerial skills to fit current management system Needs.
  • An advantageous Organizational climate within the Management System.

 

Henri Fayol developed 16 general guidelines for organizing resources:

  1. Judiciously prepare and execute the operating plan.                        
  2. Organize the human and material facets so that they are consistent with objectives, resources and requirements of the concern.                                                                                                                 
  3. Establish a single component, energetic guiding authority i.e. a Formal Management Structure.                                                                    
  4. Co-ordinate all activities and efforts.                                                                     
  5. Formulate clear, distinct and precise decisions.                                          
  6. Arrange for efficient selection so that each department is headed by a component, energetic manager and all employees are placed where they can render the greatest service.                                   
  7. Define duties.                                                                                                               
  8. Encourage initiative and responsibility.                                                         
  9. Offer fair and suitable rewards for services rendered.                              
  10. Make use of sanctions against faults and errors.                                       
  11. Maintain discipline.                                                                                           
  12. Ensure that individual interests are consistent with the general interests of the organization.                                                                            
  13. Recognize the Unity of Command.                                                              
  14.  Promote both material and human coordination.                                                                                                                  
  15.  Insitute and Effect Controls.                                                                          
  16.  Avoid regulations, red tape and (excessive) paper work.                                                   

 

5 Step Organizing Process:

  1. Reflect on Plans and Objectives.
  2. Establish major Tasks.
  3. Divide major tasks into subtasks
  4. Allocate resources and directives for subtasks.
  5. Evaluate the results of implemented organizing strategy.