Consumer Attitutde Wednesday, Nov 26 2008 

What is an Attitude?

An attitude is a learned predisposition to behave in a consistently favourable or unfavourable way with respect to a given object whether it is a product, product category, a brand, a service, an advertisement, a website, a store etc., Each property of this definition is critical to understanding why and how attitudes are relevant in consumer behaviours and marketing.

The 4 broad categories of attitude models are:

  1. Tri component attitude model
  2. Multiattribute attitude model
  3. Trying to Consume Model
  4. Attitude toward the ad Model

The tri component model of attitudes consists of 3 parts:

  1. A cognitive Component
  2. An affective Component
  3. A conative component

The cognitive component captures a consumer’s knowledge and perceptions about products and services.

The affective component focuses on a customer’s emotions or feelings with respect to a particular product or service. The affective component determines an individual’s overall assessment of the object in terms of some kind of favourableness scoring.

The Conative component is concerned with the likelihood that a consumer will act in a specific fashion with respect to the attitude object. The Conative component is many times treated as an expression of the customer’s intention to buy.

Multiattribute attitude models like attitude toward object, attitude toward behaviour and the theory of reasoned action models have received much attention from consumer researchers. These models examine consumer beliefs about specific product attributes. The thoery of trying is designed to account for the many cases in which the action or outcome is not certain. The attitude toward the ad models examine the influence of advertisements on the consumer’s attitudes toward the brand.

How attitudes are formed?

Attitudes are learned and the different learning theories provide unique insights as to how attitudes initially may be formed. Attitude formation is facilitated by direct personal experience and influenced by the ideas and experiences of friends and family members and exposure to mass media.

Individual’s personality also plays a role in attitude formation.

Strategies of Attitude Change can be put into 6 distinct categories:

  1. Changing the basic motivational function
  2. Associating the attitude object with a specific function
  3. Relating the attitude object to conflicting attitudes
  4. Altering components of the multiattribute model
  5. Changing beliefs about competititor’s brands, products and Services
  6. The Elaborated Likelihood Model.

Each of these strategies provide the marketer with alternative ways of changing consumer’s existing attitudes.

Cognitive dissonance theory suggests that the conflicting thoughts or information, following a purchase might propel consumers to change their attitudes to make them consonant with their actions.

Attribution theory focuses on how people assign casualty to events and how they form or alter attitudes as an outcome of assessing their own behaviour or the behaviour of the other people OR things.

What are you doing to ensure that your potential customers are creating favourable attitudes towards your company, brand, product and services? How are your competitors doing it? Talk to us for further support.

MANAGEMENT INNOVATIONS

managementinnovations2020@gmail.com; manojonkar@gmail.com, 919375970812

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Consumer Research – Personality & Consumer Behaviour Monday, Nov 24 2008 

Personality can be described as the psychological characteristics that both determine and reflect how a person responds to his or her environment. Although mostly the personality tends to remain consistent and enduring, it may change abruptly in response to a major life events. Personality also change gradually over time.

Theories:

3 theories of personality are prominent in the study of consume behaviour:

 

  1. Psychoanalytic Theory
  2. Neo-Freudian Theory and 
  3. Trait Theory

 

Freud’s psychoanalytic theory provides the foundation for the study of motivational research, which operates on the premise that human drives are largely unconscious in nature and serve to motivate many consumer actions.

Non- freudian theory tends to emphasize th fundamental role of social relationships in the formation and development of the personality.

Alfred Adler viewed human beings as seeking to overcome feelings of inferiorty.

Harry Stack Sullivan believed  that people attempt to establish significant and rewarding relationships with others.

Karen Horney saw inidividuals as trying to overcome feelings of anxiery and categorized them as compliant, aggresive or detached.

Trait Theory is a major departure from the qualitative or subjective approach to personality measurement. It postulates that individuals possess innate pyschological traits to a greater or lesser degree, and that traits can be measured by specifically designed scales or inventories.

Because they are simple to use and to score and  can be self-administered, personality inventories are the preferred mehtod for many researchers in the assessment of consumer personality.

Product and brand personalities represent real opportunities for marketers to take advantage of consumers’ connections to various brands they offer.

Brands often have personalities- some include “humanlike” traits and even gender. These brand personalities help shape consumer responses, preferences and loyalities.

Each individual has a perceived self image or images as a certain kind of person with certain traits, possessions, relationships, habits, behaviours etc., Consumers frequently attempt to preserve, enhance, alter or extend their self images by purchasing products or services and shopping at stores they percieve as consistent with their relevant self image and by avoiding products and stores they percieve as not consistent to their self image.

What are the personalities of your target consumers?

What is your company’s brand image? What is your product/services image?

MANAGEMENT INNOVATIONS

managementinnovations2020@gmail.com;  manojonkar@gmail.com; 91-9375970812