WHY PLANS FAIL? Thursday, Dec 11 2008 

A study by K.A. Ringbakk determined that plans fail when:

  1. Corporate Planning is not integrated into the total management system.                                                                                                                     
  2. There is a lack of understanding of the different steps of the planning process.                                                                                                    
  3. Management at different levels in the organization has not properly engaged in or contributed to planning activities.               
  4. Responsibility for planning is wrongly vested solely in the planning department.                                                                                              
  5. Management expects that plans developed will be realized with little effort.                                                                                                              
  6. In starting formal planning, too much is attempted at once.          
  7. Management fails to operate by the plan.                                                      
  8. Financial projections are confused with planning.                                    
  9. Inadequate inputs are used in planning.                                                   
  10. Management fails to grasp the overall planning process.

 

For support in planning and converting your plans in to reality, you may contact:

MANAGEMENT INNOVATIONS

managementinnovations2020@gmail.com; manojonkar@gmail.com;

919375970812

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WHAT IS A PLAN? Thursday, Dec 11 2008 

A Plan is a specific Acton proposed to help the organization achieve its objective.

A crucial part of the management of any organization is developing logical plans and then taking the steps necessary to put the plans in to action.

Regardless of how important experience related intuition may be to managers, successful management actions and strategies typically are based on reason.

Rational managers are crucial to the development of an organizational plan.

4 Dimensions of Plans:

  1. REPETITIVENESS
  2. TIME
  3. SCOPE
  4. LEVEL

REPETITIVENESS:

The repetitiveness dimension of a plan is the extent to which the plan is used over and over again. 

Some plans are specially designed for one situation that is relatively short term in nature.

Plans of this sort are essentially non repetitive.

Other Plans, however, are designed to be used time after time for long term recurring situations. These plans are basically repetitive in nature.

TIME:

The Time dimension of a plan is the length of time the plan covers.Strategical Plans cover relatively long periods of time4 and tactical plans cover relatively short periods of time.

SCOPE:

The Scope dimension of a plan is the portion of the total management system at which the plan is aimed.

Some plans are designed to cover the entire open management system: the organizational environment, inputs, process and outputs. Such a plan is often referred to as a master plan.

Other Plans are developed to cover only a portion of the management system. e.g.: A plan that covers the recruitment of new workers.

The greater the portion of the management system that a plan covers, the broader is the plan’s scope.

LEVEL:

The level dimension of a plan is the level of the organization at which the plan is aimed.

Top Level Plans are those designed for the organization’s top management; whereas the middle level and the lower level plans are designed for middle and lower management, respectively.

Since all the parts of the organization are interdependent, plans developed at any level of the organization have effect on the plans at other levels.

Need any help in planning various projects and initiatives in your organization?

MANAGEMENT INNOVATIONS

managementinnovations2020@gmail.com; manojonkar@gmail.com; 919375970812

THE PLANNER: Qualification and Evaluation Monday, Dec 8 2008 

The planner is probably the most important input in the planning subsystem. This individual combines all other inputs and influences the subsystem process so that its output is effective organizational plans.

The planner is responsible not only for developing plans but also for advising management on what actions should be taken to implement those plans.

Regardless of who actually does the planning or what organization the planning is being done in, the qualification, duties, and evaluations of the planner are all very important considerations for an effective planning subsystem.

QUALIFICATIONS OF PLANNERS:

Planners should have four primary qualifications:

  1. They should have considerable practical experience within their organization. Preferably, they should have been executives in one or more of the organization’s major departments.This experience will help them develop plans that are both practical and tailor made for the organization.                   
  2. Planners should be capable of replacing  any narrow view of the organization they may have acquired while holding other organizational positions with an understanding of the organization as a whole. They must know how all parts of the organization function and interrelate. They must have an abundance of conceptual skills.                                                                     
  3. Planners should have some knowledge of and interest in the social,political, technical and economic trends that could affect the future of the organization. They must be skillful in defining those trends and possess the expertise to determine how the organization should react to the trends to maximize its success. This qualification can be overemphasized.                                             
  4. They should be able to work well with others. Their position will inevitably require them to work closely with several key members of the organization, so its is essential that they possess the personal characteristics necessary to collaborate and advise effectively. The ability to communicate clearly, both orally and in writing, is one of the most important of these characteristics.

EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR PLANNERS:

  1. Organizational Plan is in writing.
  2. Plan is the result of all elements of the management team working together.
  3. Plan defines present and possible future business of the organization.
  4. Plan specifically mentions organizational objectives.
  5. Plan identifies future opportunities and suggests how to take advantage of them.
  6. Plan emphasizes both internal and external environments.
  7. Plan describes the attainment of objectives in operational terms whenever possible.
  8. Plan includes both long and short term recommendations.

Over and above all these, the subjective considerations include how well planners get along with key members of the organization, the amount of organizational loyalty they display and their perceived potential.

DEFINE MANAGEMENT & ITS FUNCTIONS Wednesday, Dec 3 2008 

Management is the process of reaching organizational goals by working with and through people and other organizational resources. 

Management has the following 3 characteristics:

  1. It is a process or series of continuing and related activities.
  2. It involves and concentrates on reaching organizational goals.
  3. It reaches these goals by working with and through people and other organizational resources.

 

MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS:

The 4 basic management functions that make up the management process are described in the following sections:

  1. PLANNING
  2. ORGANIZING
  3. INFLUENCING
  4. CONTROLLING.

PLANNING: Planning involves choosing tasks that must be performed to attain organizational goals, outlining how the tasks must be performed, and indicating when they should be performed.

Planning activity focuses on attaining goals. Managers outline exactly what organizations should do to be successful. Planning is concerned with the success of the organization in the short term as well as in the long term.

ORGANIZING:

Organizing can be thought of as assigning the tasks developed in the planning stages, to various individuals or groups within the organization. Organizing is to create a mechanism to put plans into action.

People within the organization are given work assignments that contribute to the company’s goals. Tasks are organized so that the output of each individual contributes to the success of departments, which, in turn, contributes to the success of divisions, which ultimately contributes to the success of the organization.

INFLUENCING:

Influencing is also referred to as motivating,leading or directing.Influencing can be defined as guiding the activities of organization members in he direction that helps the organization move towards the fulfillment of the goals.

The purpose of influencing is to increase productivity. Human-oriented work situations usually generate higher levels of production over the long term than do task oriented work situations because people find the latter type distasteful.

CONTROLLING:

Controlling is the following roles played by the manager:

  1. Gather information that measures performance
  2. Compare present performance to pre established performance norms.
  3. Determine the next action plan and modifications for meeting the desired performance parameters.

Controlling is an ongoing process.

 

MANAGEMENT INNOVATIONS

managementinnovations2020@gmail.com; manojonkar@gmail.com; 919375970812

PETER DRUCKER on Setting Management Objectives Tuesday, Jun 10 2008 

Peter Drucker believed that the survival of the company was at risk when managers emphasized only the profit objective because this single objective emphasis encourage managers to take action that will make money today with little regard for how a profit will be made tomorrow.  

8 key areas in which managers should set management system objectives are:
  1. MARKET STANDING: Management should set objectives indicating where it would like to be in relation to its competitors.                                                                                                         
  2. INNOVATION: Management should set objectives outlining its commitment to the development of new methods of operation.                                                                                             
  3. PRODUCTIVITY: Management should set objectives outlining the target levels of production.                                                                                                                                                     
  4. PHYSICAL & FINANCIAL RESOURCES: Management should set objectives regarding the use, acquisition, and maintenance of capital and monetary resources.                                              
  5. PROFITABILITY: Management should set objectives that specify the profit the company would like to generate.                                                                                                                               
  6. MANAGERIAL PERFORMANCE & DEVELOPMENT: Management should set objectives that specify rates of worker productivity as well as desirable attitudes for workers to possess.                                                                                                                                                  
  7. WORKER PERFORMANCE & ATTITUDE: Management should set objectives that specify rates of worker productivity as well as desirable attitudes for workers to possess.                                        
  8. PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY: Management should set objectives that indicate the company’s responsibilities to its customers and society and the extent to which the company intends to live up to those responsibilities.